On the boundaries of the sacred tract

IG II3 1 292 Date: 352/1 BC
 
. . . . . . . . . . . . of the . . . (5) . . . the People shall elect straightaway ten men from all the Athenians and five from the Council; and those elected shall - in the Eleusinion in the city . . . of the sacred tract (hieras orgados)[1] . . . from neither favour nor (10) enmity . . . but as justly and piously as possible . . . from the sixteenth of Posideon[2] . . . in the archonship of Aristodemos (352/1); and there shall be present the [king (basilea)] and the hierophant and the torchbearer (daidouchon)[3] and the Kerykes and the Eumolpidai and any other Athenian who (15) wishes, so that they may place the markers (horous) as piously and justly as possible; and there shall have oversight of the sacred tract (hieras orgados) and the other [sacred precincts (hierōn temenōn)] at Athens from this day for all time those whom the law requires for each of them and the Council of the Areopagos and the general (20) elected for the [protection (phulakēn)] of the country (chōras) and the patrol commanders (peripolarchous) and the demarchs and the Council in office at any time and any other Athenian who wishes, in whatever way they know how; and the secretary of the Council shall write on two pieces of tin, equal and alike, on the one, if it is preferable and better (25) for the Athenian People that the king (basilea)[4] lets out the area [of the sacred tract (hieras orgados)] which is now being worked [out or in]side the markers (horōn) for building (oikodomian) the portico (prostōiou) [and repair (episkeuēn)] of the sanctuary (hierou) of the two goddesses;[5] and on the other piece of tin, if it is preferable and better for the Athenian People to leave the area of the sacred tract (hieras orgados) which is now being worked [out or in]side the markers (horōn) (30) fallow for the two goddesses; and when the secretary has written, the chairman of the presiding committee (epistatēs ho ek tōn proedrōn) shall take each of the two pieces of tin and roll them up and tie them with wool and put them into a bronze water jug in the presence of the People; and the prytany (prutaneis) shall prepare these things; and the treasurers of the goddess (35) shall bring down a gold and a silver water-jug straightaway to the People; and the chairman (epistatēs) shall shake the bronze water-jug and take out each piece of tin in turn, and shall put the first piece of tin into the gold water-jug and the second into the silver one and bind them fast; and the prytany chairman (epistatēs tōm prutaneōn) shall seal them (40) with the public seal and any other Athenian who wishes shall counterseal them; and when they have been sealed, the treasurers shall take the water-jugs up to the acropolis; and the People shall elect three men, one from the Council, two from all the other Athenians, to go to Delphi and enquire of the god, (45) according to which of the writings the Athenians are to act concerning the sacred tract (hieras orgados), whether those from the gold water-jug or those from the silver one; and when they have come back from the god, they shall break open the water jugs, and the oracle and the writings on the pieces of tin shall be read to the People; and according to whichever of the writings the (50) god ordains it to be preferable and best for the Athenian People, according to those they are to act, so that matters relating to the two goddesses shall be handled as piously as possible and never in future shall anything impious happen concerning the [sacred tract (hieras orgados)] or the other sacred places (hierōn) at Athens;[6] and the secretary of the Council shall [now] inscribe this decree (55) and the previous one of Philokrates [about the sacred places (hierōn)] on two stone stelai and stand one at Eleusis by the [gateway (propulōi) of the sanctuary (hierou)], the other in the Eleusinion in the city; and the hierophant and the priestess of Demeter shall also sacrifice [a propitiatory sacrifice (arestērion)] to the two goddesses . . . the treasurer of the People . . . (60) drachmas; and give for inscribing . . . drachmas for each of the two from the People’s fund for expenditure on decrees; and give for each of those elected to go to Delphi - drachmas for travelling expenses; and give to those elected on the sacred tract (hieran orgada) 5 drachmas each (65) from the People’s fund for expenditure on decrees; and the official sellers (pōlētas) shall [supply] as many stone [markers (horous)] as may be needed . . . the contract (misthōma) . . . the Council . . . the presiding committee (proedros) . . . draw up specifications for their manufacture . . . [and] placement on the sacred (70) tract (hieras orgados) . . . those who have been elected; and the treasurer of the People shall give the money . . . stone . . . the markers (horous) from the People’s fund for expenditure on decrees. [The following were elected on the] sacred tract (hieran orgada) (75) [to put new markers (horous)] in place of the dilapidated or missing or obsolete ones (anti tōn ekpeptōkotōn). [From the Council]: Arkephon of Halai, . . . of Thria, . . . of Hagnous. [From private individuals: ... ] Hippokrates of Kerameis, . . . of Kedoi, Emmenides of Koile or Hekale (80) . . . of Sounion, Aristeides of Oe, . . . Glaukon of Perithoidai, Phaidros . . . for the oracle at Delphi. From private individuals: . . . Eudidaktos of Lamptrai. [From the Council]: . . . of Lamptrai. The following correction is made: (85) if this decree lacks anything, the Council shall be empowered to vote whatever seems to it to be best.